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Are the Troyans extinct?

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If you are looking for the habitants of the City of Troy (during the Trojan war) please keep reading.

According to this in Wikipedia, the "troyans" are not extinct:

"Troyan (also spelled Troian, Bulgarian: Троян) is a town in central Bulgaria with population of about 30,000 and territory of 888,850 m². It is located 160km from Sofia. The nearest civilian airport is Gorna Oryahovitsa, 105 km away. The river of Beli Osam passes through the heart of the town.

Minko Akimov of Citizens for European Development of Bulgaria has been the town's mayor since 2007."

Includes CC-BY-SA content from Wikipedia's Troyan article (authors)

However if you are referring to the habitants of the City Of Troy commonly called "troian" or "trojan", then perhaps yes:

"Troy (Greek: Τροία, Troia, also Ἴλιον, Ilion; Latin: Trōia, Īlium;[1] Hittite: Wilusa or Truwisa) is a legendary city and center of the Trojan War, as described in the Epic Cycle, and especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Trojan refers to the inhabitants and culture of Troy.

Today it is the name of an archaeological site, the traditional location of Homeric Troy, Turkish Truva, in Hisarlık in Anatolia, close to the seacoast in what is now Çanakkale province in northwest Turkey, southwest of the Dardanelles under Mount Ida.

A new city of Ilium was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople and declined gradually during the Byzantine era.

In the 1870s a wealthy German businessman, Heinrich Schliemann, excavated the area. Later excavations revealed several cities built in succession to each other. One of the earlier cities (Troy VII) is often identified with Homeric Troy. While such an identity is disputed, the site has been successfully identified with the city called Wilusa in Hittite texts; Ilion (which goes back to earlier Wilion with a digamma) is thought to be the Greek rendition of that name.

The archaeological site of Troy was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1998."


Includes CC-BY-SA content from Wikipedia's Troy article (authors)

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